Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Veterans’ Category

Welcome to BostonA reminder:  Tonight, June 14, at 8pm PBS’s Genealogy Roadshow arrives at Boston’s Faneuil Hall. The trio of genealogists helps locals uncover links to the Salem Witch Trials, orphan trains, and Boston’s founders.

Next Tuesday, June 21, the Roadshow reconvenes at the Providence Public Library. There an investigation reveals how one key document – a passport– sheds light on how one family survived the Holocaust. Other segments cover an African American who served in World War I, and a man’s Amish relatives.

PBS affiliates often show these programs at staggered times after the original telecast. Full episodes, as well as previews of future episodes, should also turn up on the PBS website.

vea/14 June 2016
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

Read Full Post »

The Newton War Memorial was dedicated on Armistice Day, 11 November 1931, to honor all those in the military who served, who fought, and who died to protect our country’s freedoms. The following photographs depict parts of that ongoing memorial.

DSC01752 front

The Entrance to Newton’s War Memorial

 

DSC06223

DSC06225

 

The Vietnam War was fought from November 1, 1955 to April 30, 1975.

DSC06240

 

The Korean War was fought from June 25, 1950 to July 27, 1953.

DSC06238

 

World War II  was fought from September 1, 1939 to September 2, 1945. The United States entered the war on December 8, 1941.

DSC06277

 

The conflicts before World War II are represented by dioramas.

 

World War I was fought from July 28, 1914 to November 11, 1918. The United States formally declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917.

DSC06232“Somewhere in France” 1917 – 1918

 

The War Between the States was fought from the firing on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861 to Lee’s surrender to Grant at the Appomattox Courthouse on April 9, 1865.

DSC06237Pickett’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863

 

The War of 1812 was fought from June 18, 1812 to February 18, 1815.

DSC06229The American Constitution vs. the British Guerriere on August 19, 1812

 

The Revolutionary War was fought from April 19, 1775 to September 3, 1783.

DSC06245Valley Forge, the Winter of 1777 to 1778

 

DSC02075 flags horizontal pixThe MIA and American Flags, Still Flying, in Front of the War Memorial

 

vea/26 May 2016
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

 

 

Read Full Post »

“U.S. troops go over the side of a Coast Guard manned combat transport to enter the landing barges at Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, as the invasion gets under way.” November 1943. This picture is from the National Archives online.

———————————————————————————————————————————

With Memorial Day almost upon us,  we remember family members who have been in the military, those who fought and those who died protecting the freedoms that we still enjoy. We regret that we don’t know more about them and what they went through.  Over the past few months I have been working on a guide to finding information on family members who fought in World War II.   It is in a relatively new software format known as a LibGuide.

Using LibGuides

This guide is divided into four sections represented by  four tabs to the left. You can move from one section to the other by clicking a tab. The guide, for now,  includes books and websites.  Eventually links to relevant blogs, blog postings, and articles may also be included.  Books are linked to the library’s online catalog.  Click on a specific title and you will find out whether or not it it available at Newton. It will also give you all the book’s bibliographic information. This will help you locate the book if  you belong to a library network other than Minuteman.  All website links listed are live links.  Just click on them and you are there.

Each highlighted heading that follows will bring you to the tab/page being discussed.

How to Do  Research, Find Records, and Get Help

When you first go into “Finding Family Members Who Fought in World War II”, you will find books to help you with your military research, two specifically dedicated to World War II.  You will also find links to various web sites, such as the military records section of the National Archives and indexes to other online resources.

Personal Narratives: A Rich Source of Information

Material reached by clicking the second tab will include two types of personal narratives.  The first is military narratives. There is a wealth of information that can be found in the writings of individuals who actually served during the war.  This type of work often lends added insight and background information to your own search,  not to mention some understanding of what these people went through, especially before, during, and after fighting. The books listed in these sections are just a tiny selection of what is available. If you click on a book of interest, the record that comes up will include subject headings.  You can click on a heading to bring up other books or use a heading as the basis for a keyword search.

The other type of personal narrative included here are those of family members who sought to find either additional information on individuals or to locate family members missing in action. The books contain specific information on the methods of a search and where relevant information was found. It might help you in your own search.

Histories of Military Branches, Regiments, Sqaudrons, Ships, Crews…

This section (the third tab) includes works written about regiments, divisions, and broader service histories, as well as smaller groups.  These are often overlooked sources of information that can be of tremendous help once you find in what part of the military your family member served.  It may give you additional sources of information when you come up against a brick wall in your search.  It also helps to put an individual’s service into a broader context.

The Difficulty of Remembering and Saving Wartime Memories

The last section provides information for veterans who are considering saving their personal military experiences before they are lost.  This  is often done so that their fellow combatants, their friends,  will not be forgotten.  The combat veteran faces a unique and difficult challenge.  “Do Bar Fights Count?,” written by a woman who helps veterans and runs writing workshops for them, explains the problem.  War is traumatic.  It forever changes a person who has been through battle. To write about it is to relive it as though it is happening now.  I had a cousin who was a young medic on Omaha Beach. He told me that you grow up quickly when you have your best friend die in your arms. Only the combat veteran who has gone through battle understands its deep, personal costs. They deserve nothing less than our gratitude, our understanding, and our deep respect.

vea/24 May 2012
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com

Read Full Post »

www.geneabloggers.com/

Just another WordPress.com site

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter

One Rhode Island Family

My Genealogical Adventures through 400 Years of Family History