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Archive for the ‘Security’ Category

115  Larger Question MarkAfter doing the Heartbleed post yesterday, I started thinking about all the passwords we use for access to our websites.  Many people still use one password for all their sites.  This is a very bad idea, especially if you have a large number of sites that need this type of access.  I have so many that I have them listed on a large, old fashioned Rolodexes I managed to dig out a few years ago.  Even that method could be improved upon.  I started hunting around and discovered that Life Hacker has done an excellent posting on how password vulnerability has changed and what we need to do to keep up.  As is usual with Life Hacker, the article is so good and so thorough that I cannot improve on it.  I am just going to provide the title with an imbedded link here.  All you have to do is click on it.  I would highly suggest that you do.  It may save you a lot of grief in the future.

Your Clever Password Tricks Aren’t Protecting You from Today’s Hackers

 

vea/16 April 2014
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

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I first heard about the Heartbleed bug from Thomas MacEntee’s Geneabloggers’ FaceBook posting on April 11th.  This is a serious encryption flaw that was in security software that became available in December 2011 (according to wikipedia.)  What did/does it do?  Names, passwords, and content that went out over the Internet to http sites were easily accessible and not protected. My understanding at this point is that https sites and specially secured sites such as credit card and banking sites were not affected.  It was discovered in March of 2014, over two years later.  (I wondered why FamilySearch had a web address beginning with https.  Now I’m learning why.)

I read that as early as 2010 Facebook was supposed to give their users an option to use https.  I tried to follow the directions on my Facebook account and found nothing.  Then I read a 2011 blub that they were dragging their heels on the upgrade.  Looks like they still are, unless I’m missing something.  I was almost convinced that I was being over cautious by never using my name on a social networking site.  Now I’m glad I don’t.   I’ve compiled a list of links that you might want to check out, starting with the two that I got from Thomas MacEntee.

 What the Heartbleed Security Bug Means for You from LifeHacker

Genealogy History Report Card on the Heartbleed Security Flaw from Tammy Hepps Treeline Blog

Heartbleed Disclosure Timeline: Who Knew What and When  by Ben Grubb of the Sydney Morning Herald

Heartbleed from Wikipedia

‘Heartbleed’ bug undoes Web encryption, reveals Yahoo passwords   from cnet.com

Heartbleed bug: Check which sites have been patched from cnet                                                                                      We compiled a list of the top 100 sites across the Web, and checked to see if the Heartbleed bug was patched.

Heartbleed bug: What you need to know (FAQ)from cnet                                                                                                        The security vulnerability has implications for users across the Web. Here’s what the bug means for you.

Akamai Heartbleed patch not a fix after all   from cnet                                                                                                              The Web infrastructure company’s patch was supposed to have handled the problem. Turns out it protects only three of six critical encryption values.

vea/15 April 2014
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

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Dick Eastman includes a very interesting piece regarding Ellis Island in his March 19th EOGN  Plus Edition.  I read that not only was Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty hard hit by Hurricane Sandy, but that all their technology on the island was destroyed.   In their own words:  At Ellis, all of our technology, digital infrastructure and servers that support the American Family Immigration History Center® were completely destroyed. Luckily, the immigration database was kept offsite and has remained accessible.  Thanks to that backup, you can still access their immigration information at http://www.ellisisland.org.

What have you done to back up your files lately?  Is your  backup in the same location as your computer?  What happened during Hurricane Sandy is a pointed reminder not only to back up your data, but to also have a backup off site.  This is just as important for your personal files as for those at your business  It makes “The Cloud”  look a bit more appealing.

Need help?  Kimberly Powell writes a very informative article on “How to Disaster Proof Your Genealogy Data: Cloud Based Backup and Storaage.”  Check it out by clicking the article title.  Saving copies of those precious photos in the cloud is not a bad idea either.  How often have we read about photos being lost in fires, hurricanes and tornados?  If you need more information on this specific topic,  a good place to start is “Comparing the Best Ways to Store Your Photos Online” by Sharon Bakinin.

Do you have any experience backing up your own material, good or bad, that you would like to share?  Just leave a comment.

vea/27 March 2013
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass

Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net

Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com

Exploring Newton’s Past (a LibGuide): http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy?hs=a

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A Genealogist In The Archives

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

Boston 1775

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Legal Genealogist

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

Nutfield Genealogy

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

One Rhode Island Family

My Genealogical Adventures through 400 Years of Family History