Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Magazines and Periodicals’ Category

DSC06280I just received the June/July issue of Internet Genealogy.  One of the first sections I go to in each issue is “Net Notes.” It’s a series of short pieces covering recent website activity that may be of interest to readers. The first entry describes some online releases from the Library and Archives Canada (LAC).  I have a special interest in Canadian genealogy so I took a closer look — and came to an unexpected halt. One of the entries cites LAC’s release of a database consisting entirely of immigrants from the Ukraine (1890-1930) arriving in Canadian and American ports. I had just put together a list on Ukrainian genealogical resources for several patrons who needed help on this topic. This entry gave me another resource to add to my list that might help break down some of their brick walls. If it hadn’t been for this article, I might never have found this little gem.

Flipping through genealogy magazines can not only help to keep you up to date, but can unearth treasure you’d never find otherwise. Perhaps some of the following might help you. Do you have ancestors in the American colonies during the Revolution or in the United States during the War of 1812? The Canadian piece also includes references to databases on the War of 1812, and to the Book of Negroes (with 3,000 names of Black Loyalists who fled the Port of New York at the end of the Revolutionary War). It concludes with another database consisting of the recently digitized list of Loyalists and British Soldiers (for the period 1772-1784) from the Carleton Papers.

Other articles in this issue center around saving family stories. One describes what can be done with FamilySearch.org’s Memories section, which is devoted to researching and preserving family stories. Then there are related pieces, “Stellar Storytelling Apps” and “Recording Family Interviews with Audacity.”

DSC06341British genealogy is represented with two articles.  One lists seven websites relating specifically to the Victorian era. The second highlights three free UK websites run by volunteers.

The magazine rounds off with articles on “Researching the Great Depression,” “Supreme Court Cases and Your Family History,” and a review of Yale’s Photogrammar Project that digitizes photographs of the 1930s and 1940s and makes them available online. There are also the monthly features “The Back Page,” “Genealogical Society Announcements,” and additional short pieces in the Net Notes already mentioned.

DSC06342Perhaps I now have you curious, but frustrated because you don’t subscribe to the magazine. Not to worry. The Newton Free Library does. Pay us a visit. You can find this and other genealogy magazines just to the right as you enter the Special Collections Room on the first floor.  Take a few minutes to see what’s there.  Here there be discoveries to be made, brick walls to be dismantled, and gold to be found.

 

 

vea/16 June 2016
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

FINDING MAGAZINES AND PERIODICALS

Periodical AreaIt’s a changing world out there and not always for the better. Have you ever noticed that new does not always mean improved? Just more complicated.

There used to be three reliable computer magazines that I often checked: Smart Computing (for beginners), PC World, and PC Magazine. The last two had a nice range of articles for every level, from beginners to experienced computer users. None now exist as either as hard copy or online magazines. If you own a Mac, however, you are in luck. Mac World still exists in a paper format.

If anyone reading this knows of a good, current computer magazine for beginners, or at least for non-techies, please let me know. It can be online or on paper.

USING WEBSITES

When looking at any website for the first time, you should always do three things.
1. Read the “About” section first.
2. Check for FAQs (frequently asked questions).
3. Look for tabs near the top of the home page that have a small v next to them. This denotes a down arrow that may or may not be filled in. Clicking on the arrow gives you a drop down menu. The selections offered will provide additional information.

Following these steps will keep you from wasting time on the wrong site and completely missing the perfect one.

I have found the websites that follow to be useful. Please read the descriptions accompanying each one. In them I give you additional tips for using the site and others like them.

SUGGESTED WEBSITES

Computer Newbies Help (Forum)
http://www.newbiesforum.com/phpbb3
This site is a forum. Forums are places where you can ask questions. Often these have people who work for the forum both doing the monitoring and answering queries. Other times questions are only answered by whoever happens to be visiting the site. You will find other forums on your own. You will discover which best meets your needs and who are the best responders. The nice thing about this particular forum is that is expressly designed for newbies. Computer Newbies Help does not have an “About” section, but it does have FAQ’s. Make sure you check your section of interest for the date of the latest posting. Some of these will be as up-to-date as today. One hasn’t been posted to since 2011.

Kim Komando (Radio) Show (Up-to-Date Tech News and Advice)
http://www.komando.com
Kim’s radio show has been around for years. The website is definitely worth a close look. At first there appears to be no place to ask a question or to access a topic. Near the top you will see a line of tabs: The words “The Show”, “Read” and “Watch” each have that v (down arrow) I mentioned above. Here you will find information about the show, forums and topics. Kim’s radio show and the home page of her website help direct you to some of the current topics of interest. You may have to dig a bit to find your topic of interest.

eHow — the how to do just about anything site
http://www.ehow.com/ehow-tech
This is one of the first “how to” sites I ever used and it is always worth a visit. The people who use it are the ones who provide the How tos. The entries are usually well written and easy to follow. (Ignore the ads that usually appear in the middle of the instructions.) Make sure you check the date the instructions were posted. If you need information on how to do something in Windows 8.1 and the post is dated 2012, it’s going to be dealing with the wrong version of Windows.

Basic Computer Knowledge Questions from eHow
http://www.ehow.com/list_6299776_basic-computer-knowledge-questions.html
eHow covers a lot more topics than just computers. The above is a shortcut to a subsection to their computer section. It specifically covers basic questions about computers.

How To Solve the 10 Most Common Tech Support Problems Yourself
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2047667/how-to-solve-the-10-most-common-tech-support-problems-yourself.html
These suggestions are still good, solid tips. But check the url (web address) directly above. You will see that it is from PC World. Since this magazine no longer exists. The advice given here is good general advice. But the older this piece gets, the larger the chances that the recommended websites for the fixes may not work.

Top 10 Computer Repair Forums and Message Boards from Computer Technician (if you are feeling brave)
http://www.computertechnician.net/top-10-computer-repair-forums-and-messageboards
This is an interesting listing of forums. I just wish the piece were dated. The only date I see is the copyright date of the site at the bottom of the screen – 2014.

Top 10 Safe Computing Tips from MIT (if you are not feeling quite so brave)
https://ist.mit.edu/security/tips
MIT may sound a little scary to a neophyte. Don’t let it deter you. These are good, basic rules of the road and will help keep the information on your computer safe. Another entry that is not dated, however.

Windows Basics for All Topics (for Windows 7)
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/windows-basics-all-topics#1TC=windows-7
Nicely set up by topic. When you pull up an article though, the print is on the small side. To make print larger on your computer screen, hold down the Ctrl key (usually on the lower left hand corner of your keyboard) and tap the + key (usually upper right). To make it smaller again, do the same only with the – key.

 

The next two sites are from the perspective of the person on the other side, the person who is trying to help you. Reading this may help you to figure out exactly what you need to ask and how you need to ask it.

How to Help Someone Who is Computer Illiterate with a Computer Issue
http://www.ehow.com/how_2165663_who-computer-illiterate-computer-issue.html

How to Help Someone Use a Computer from UCLA
http://polaris.gseis.ucla.edu/pagre/how-to-help.html

 

ONE SOCIAL NETWORKING SITE

Technology for Genealogy Interest Group – Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/groups/techgen
Some things are worth getting a Facebook Account for and this is one of them. Not only do you get a lot of tips, but you can ask a question. The answers come from people who have already had and solved the same problem you are having.
I do have a tip about using a site like this. I have never completely trusted social networking, so I have never used my name as a sign in. I chose something relevant instead. I decided on several monikers I would wanted to use and then tried to match it to a gmail account. If you decide on one screen name for everything, people are likely to get to know you and recognize you by that. It may take you some extra time. But it’s worth it.

vea/9 September 2014
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

Read Full Post »

A Genealogist In The Archives

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

Boston 1775

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Legal Genealogist

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

Nutfield Genealogy

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

One Rhode Island Family

My Genealogical Adventures through 400 Years of Family History