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Archive for the ‘Massachusetts’ Category

In September 1774 the farmers of Middlesex County rose up and ended royal government in most of Massachusetts. For the next seven months, Patriot activists and the British governor raced to seize artillery. Cannon disappeared from ships, shore batteries and even armories under redcoat guard. In Newton, citizens voted to form their own artillery company. Join John Bell, author of The Road to Concord, as he uncovers the hidden history that led to the Revolutionary War. The program is cosponsored by Historic Newton. A book signing will follow. [From the Newton Free Library’s online Calendar of Events.]

From the publisher of The Road to Concord:

“Here is the suspenseful story of how a handful of mechanics in 1774 smuggled Boston’s brass cannon out of town from under the noses of the British troops. J. L. Bell is a historical detective par excellence who has recovered an important, little-known episode of the onset of the American Revolution.” —Alfred F. Young, author The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution

“In this well-researched narrative, Mr. Bell provides an interesting twist on the usual account of the British march to Concord on April 18-19, 1775. Mr. Bell’s retelling of the story from the point of view of missing cannon demonstrates in a compelling and convincing manner why General Gage was especially anxious that his troops reach Concord.”—Patrick M. Leehey, Research Director, Paul Revere House, Boston

In the early spring of 1775, on a farm in Concord, Massachusetts, British army spies located four brass cannon belonging to Boston’s colonial militia that had gone missing months before. British general Thomas Gage had been searching for them, both to stymie New England’s growing rebellion and to erase the embarrassment of having let cannon disappear from armories under redcoat guard. Anxious to regain those weapons, he drew up plans for his troops to march nineteen miles into unfriendly territory. The Massachusetts Patriots, meanwhile, prepared to thwart the general’s mission. There was one goal Gage and his enemies shared: for different reasons, they all wanted to keep the stolen cannon as secret as possible. Both sides succeeded well enough that the full story has never appeared until now.

The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War by historian J. L. Bell reveals a new dimension to the start of America’s War for Independence by tracing the spark of its first battle back to little-known events beginning in September 1774. The author relates how radical Patriots secured those four cannon and smuggled them out of Boston, and how Gage sent out spies and search parties to track them down. Drawing on archives in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, the book creates a lively, original, and deeply documented picture of a society perched on the brink of war.

J. L. BELL is the proprietor of Boston1775.net, a popular website dedicated to the history of the American Revolution in New England. A Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society and American Antiquarian Society, he is author of the National Park Service’s study of George Washington’s work in Cambridge, and has delivered papers to the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Organization of American Historians, and historic sites around greater Boston.

From The Curious Genealogist: Take a minute to click on the link to Bell’s blog Boston 1775 in green directly above.  If you have any interest in history or Boston, you’ll probably be staying far longer than a minute. It will be time well spent.

vea/6 July 2017
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  
http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net

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Celebrate Independence Day with free access to AmericanAncestors.org.

Family historians and genealogists–declare your independence from an incomplete family tree! Search and browse the 1.4 BILLION records on AmericanAncestors.org, the award-winning NEHGS website.

These databases include vital records (state, church, cemetery, and more), U.S. census records, genealogical journal articles, probate records, and other collections that can help advance your research. Already a Guest Member of NEHGS? Your password is your passport to freedom–and to many new discoveries. NEHGS members can share this special offer with family and friends and invite them to join the celebration.

Visit our website from 12:01 a.m. Eastern time on Thursday, June 29, through 11:59 p.m. Eastern time on Thursday, July 6, for access to all AmericanAncestors.org databases–with only a Guest Registration. Questions? Contact us!

Written by NEHGS

vea/28 June 2017
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  
http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net

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Welcome to BostonA reminder:  Tonight, June 14, at 8pm PBS’s Genealogy Roadshow arrives at Boston’s Faneuil Hall. The trio of genealogists helps locals uncover links to the Salem Witch Trials, orphan trains, and Boston’s founders.

Next Tuesday, June 21, the Roadshow reconvenes at the Providence Public Library. There an investigation reveals how one key document – a passport– sheds light on how one family survived the Holocaust. Other segments cover an African American who served in World War I, and a man’s Amish relatives.

PBS affiliates often show these programs at staggered times after the original telecast. Full episodes, as well as previews of future episodes, should also turn up on the PBS website.

vea/14 June 2016
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

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Wayland Public Library has started a Genealogy Club. The following flyer is for a program they are presenting in May.  Newton also has their Genealogy Club Meetings on the second Wednesday of the month, otherwise I’d be going myself.  If you are working on Massachusetts genealogy it sounds like a place you should be.  Check it out.

Basic Information if you are planning to attend: The Wayland Public Library is located at 5 Concord Road in (of course) Wayland.  To get there from the intersection of Route 20 and Route 27, you turn north onto Route 126. Bear right at the fork. The library is the large red brick building immediately on the right. On Wednesdays the library closes at 9:00 pm.  Their website is: http://waylandlibrary.org.  Enjoy.

Wayland Program Flyer

vea/14 April 2016
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

 

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American Ancestors NEHGS logo

Do NOT mistake this site for Ancestry.  American Ancestors is the web site of one of the premier genealogy societies in the country.  The New England Historic Genealogical Society (Newbury Street, Boston) has resources  that are unique. The NEHGS is opening up its website, American Ancestors, to everyone  for free for one week. From today, Wednesday, April 6th to April 13th, you can go to http://www.americanancestors.org/Free-Billion and hunt for your ancestors.  Though obviously an extraordinary site for New England research, check this out even if you have (as far as you know) no New England ancestors.  There is a reason why they changed the name of their website from New England Ancestors to American Ancestors. Check it out.

vea/6 April 2016
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

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The Durant-Kenrick Homestead" October 2012Historic Newton is so committed to helping you preserve your family’s unique history that they want to help. Do you have family photos, slides, documents, or movies that are precious to you? Do you wish to understand what is needed to protect them so they will be available for future generations? Then you will want to come to the Durant-Kenrick House at 286 Waverly Avenue in Newton on Tuesday, November 17th at 7:00. At that time Hisoric Newton will be presenting two very knowledgeable speakers on this topic.

Eric Niloff, owner of EverPresent, will explain the services that his company Picture from Historic Newton on Saving Family Historyoffers.  His business is based on helping people share their family history. Included will be a variety of formats. He will also answer questions about how best to organize these cherished family heirlooms and build a digital preservation plan.

Sara Goldberg, Historic Newton’s own archivist, will guide you in the care of the originals once they have been digitized and returned to you.  She will help you understand what can to done to help these truly irreplaceable family keepsakes stand the test of time.

vea/3 November 2015
Newton Free Library
Newton, Mass
Library website:  http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net
Genealogy blog:  https://thecuriousgenealogist.wordpress.com
Genealogy LibGuide:  http://guides.newtonfreelibrary.net/genealogy

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SummerofSharing

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Older Posts »

A Genealogist In The Archives

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

Boston 1775

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Legal Genealogist

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

Nutfield Genealogy

FINDING ANSWERS AT THE NEWTON FREE LIBRARY http://www.newtonfreelibrary.net Newton, Massachusetts

One Rhode Island Family

My Genealogical Adventures through 400 Years of Family History

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